Vaccine or not

“To vaccinate, or not to vaccinate- that is the question:
Whether ’tis nobler in the mind to suffer 2015
The vomiting and sh*ts of outrageous diseases
Or to take vaccines against a sea of viruses,
And by opposing end them.”

Hamlet paraphrased circa 2015 in the US

Last week was vaccination week in the Casa de Brosephus.  A total of 6 shots in two days of doctor’s visits for all three kids.  The baby had his 4 month check up and 3 shots.  The next day, the middle child had her 2 year check up and 2 shots while big sister got her first dose of the flu shot.  In total, they received 8 different vaccines following the CDC guidelines for children’s vaccines.

When it comes to children and vaccines, I didn’t hesitate to get my kids vaccinated.  For me, it’s a no-brainer.  I’ve read the stories about the supposed links to childhood vaccines and autism.  I see it like this, my kids get their shots and risk being diagnosed with autism if that outcome happens.  Orrrrrrrr…..  I don’t vaccinate my kids, and I risk them getting killed by some virus or disease where their death could have been prevented by a shot.  There’s no reason to even think twice there.

The issue with vaccines hit the news circuit when the measles outbreak started at Disneyland.  Some people tend to forget that other countries don’t vaccinate like we do, so there’s always the chance of contracting a sickness that’s not encountered much here.  Working around international travelers, that’s something that is always in the back of my mind as not every sickness has outward visible signs at the point of being contagious.  I think it’s a good conversation that we need to have as people from both sides of the debate, pro and anti vaccine, have valid concerns that should be addressed.

One way to not address them and effectively deal with the situation is to allow politics to inject themselves into the center of the debate.  Whether it’s Rand Paul, Chris Christie, or some other elected official, if it is not their job to deal with healthcare policy, then they need to not try to take over the debate.  Politics and politicians have a way of screwing things up in my view, and this is definitely one area that doesn’t need to be screwed.

If you decide to vaccinate your kids, then that’s your decision.  If you decide to not vaccinate them, then that’s your decision as well.  Regardless to what you do, remember that your kids are going to be around other kids.  The decisions that you make don’t just affect the health of your child or children.  Those decisions affect everyone the come into close contact with.  See the measles outbreak as proof.

 

 

Advertisements

7 thoughts on “Vaccine or not

  1. I believe Jay had cited earlier that measel vaccine do not cause autism (as per CDC). I agree that politicians for whatever reason make a mockery of the scientific community’s findings. Combine that with religion and ignorance, things get very blurry and many folks get confused between reality and BS.

    My belief is CDC, for the common good, should put forth their findings in the public domain and the press should give them as much coverage as they do with politicians and religious nuts.

    Like

    • My belief is CDC, for the common good, should put forth their findings in the public domain and the press should give them as much coverage as they do with politicians and religious nuts.

      I think all research from all sides need to be made public. Allow peer review to see what’s provable vs what’s just speculation. That way, we can all base our opinions and/or beliefs on solid science and step away from the snake oil.

      Like

  2. I agree that politicians for whatever reason make a mockery of the scientific community’s findings

    That’s true but sometimes the scientific community does it to themselves. The vaccine/autism link was accepted as gospel by many for quite a few years before it was debunked. “Scientists say” should be viewed with just as much skepticism as what anybody else says and it often isn’t. In a lot of cases, especially with the general public, it’s accepted on blind faith. Scientists are human just like anybody else and susceptible to the same temptations and flaws as any other human.

    As to the point on vaccinations, I think vaccinating is pretty much a no brainer but people who disagree have the right not to have their kids vaccinated. On the flip side, the school system has the right to not accept their kids as students, to protect the other kids.

    (I’m from the generation who got the sugar cubes and know people older than me who actually had polio, and are still suffering its effects in old age, so I know pretty much first hand, the value of vaccinations.)

    Like

  3. (I’m from the generation who got the sugar cubes and know people older than me who actually had polio, and are still suffering its effects in old age, so I know pretty much first hand, the value of vaccinations.)

    I think that kind of wisdom diminishes the farther we get away from seeing outbreaks of deadly or debilitating illnesses. Some of the younger generations take things for granted because they haven’t seen the effects of polio and such first hand.

    I think the measles outbreak kinda shook some people out of that isolated stupor that many fall into because of not seeing things ourselves. At work, we have scares from time to time where people come in and we suspect they’re carrying something. Things usually turn out ok, but there’s always the distinct possibility of being exposed to things that we’re not accustomed to seeing or treating here.

    Like

  4. I’m old, too. I remember the sugar cubes, and I got all of the standard childhood diseases except diphtheria because there weren’t vaccines for any of them except diphtheria. I missed a month of school when I had measles and chicken pox back to back. That wasn’t at all uncommon in those days. Not many modern families could manage a kid who had to stay home for that long. I’m a big believer in immunizations.

    That said, I believe the CDC’s vaccine schedule is too aggressive. I understand why it is: for one thing, they want every baby to be immunized against as many things as possible as soon as possible because you never know when a child might be exposed to something, and for another, they feel like they can increase compliance if they give as many inoculations as they can while the doctor has the kid in the room. But my grands sometimes got three or four shots against six or seven illnesses in one visit. Then they were feverish and cranky for a couple of days and worn out and listless for a week more. If we could get more parents to comply with vaccinating at all, herd immunity might let the CDC adopt a schedule to spread out the vaccinations over more time and save the kids some misery.

    Like

    • I’ve heard others talk about the pace of the vaccines, and that may be something worthwhile to look at. Luckily, my kids haven’t had bad reactions thus far although the baby gave the daycare people a fit today. They were seriously worried about him because he’s usually calm and laughing with them. Today, he was like a combination of Sam Kinnison(sp?) and Samuel L. Jackson. To say that he gave them hell would be an understatement. I don’t think it had anything to do with the shots last week, but who knows?

      Like

  5. To expand on the old thing lol

    I had measles, mumps (both sides at the same time), chicken pox, and something else that I was so young I can’t remember what it was. In my case, the mumps and measles lasted about a week and the chicken pox the only thing I remember is itching like crazy and being told not to scratch. Even then though, we weren’t really very far removed from the time when these could have been fatal, so they were taken very seriously.

    Both my Granny and my Grandma had typhoid fever when they were young. We always got whatever the typhoid shots were called.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s