The fallout from Mississippi’s GOP primary continues

Evan Alvarez is the one on the right

The chairman of the Mississippi Federation of College Republicans, Evan Alvarez, threw up the deuces to the organization this past weekend because, in his words, “I believe that the Republican Party has allowed these groups of extremist to have too much of a voice and because of that, the platform of the Republican Party has shifted too far to the right in my opinion.”   The group of extremists that he’s referring to is non other than the Tea Party.

There was a dust-up within the (MFCR) because a member broke the rules of the group and endorsed the Tea Party candidate in Mississippi’s GOP primary.  Their rules allowed for individual endorsement of candidates, but they could not use the group’s name in making that endorsement.  The offending member, Kolby Busby, sent out robocalls for the Tea Party candidate, Chris McDaniel during the course of the campaign.

Here’s the background info on the whole thing from the Jackson, Mississippi newspaper The Clarion-Ledger:

Alvarez’s resignation comes after the MFCR board decided not to remove Kolby Busby from the organization. Busby faced impeachment charges because he issues two robocalls on behalf of Chris McDaniel in the Republican Party primary and primary runoff for U.S. Senate. In the robocalls, Busby affiliated himself with MFCR, which violates the organization’s policy of remaining neutral in primaries.

Alvarez came under scrutiny from McDaniel supporters and some members of MFCR who criticized him and others for openly supporting incumbent U.S. Sen. Thad Cochran. Alvarez defended individual members’ support of either candidate so long as they were not doing so in an official capacity with MFCR.

There were Tea Party backers who attended the impeachment hearing and caused enough of a ruckus that the meeting was postponed.  After going through the whole ordeal, Alvarez decided he had enough and penned his letter of resignation and contacted Mississippi Democrats about joining their party.  Here’s his resignation letter courtesy of The Clarion-Ledger.

I over the last 48 hours or so, I have been in deep thought about the future of MFCR and of the Republican Party. I have come to the conclusion that I no longer want to be the leader of the Mississippi Federation of College Republicans. I refuse to simply let people break the rules and think they don’t have to answer for their actions, admit they were wrong, or even apologize. When I ran for Chairman in the spring, I ran to be Chairman of the Mississippi Federation of College REPUBLICANS, not the Mississippi Federation of College “Tea Partiers”. Also, I believe that the Republican Party has allowed these groups of extremist to have too much of a voice and because of that, the platform of the Republican Party has shifted too far to the right in my opinion. For example, the drastic cuts on needed federal funding that these groups of Republican extremists support would leave society weak and crippled. Secondly, their far right stance on immigration is not only ignorant, but it is cruel. After all our country is a nation of immigrants and should welcome immigrants from every country. My father was an immigrant from Cuba and came to America in 1959 because of the freedom that this nation offers. This freedom should be available to each and every individual that wants to come work hard and pursue his or her goals in America. Finally, I believe the Republican Party has not done enough to put a stop to the hatred and cruel words and actions of the far right extremist in the party. The Republican Party consistently says they are trying to appeal to minorities, but this will never happen when we allow members of party to say cruel and ignorant things about Women, African Americans, Hispanics, and other minorities in our country. I simply cannot be apart of organization that have members who support these far right extremist views, much less be the Chairman of the organization. So in conclusion, I, Evan Alvarez, am hereby resigning my position as Chairman of the Mississippi Federation of College Republicans, as well as my membership at the Mississippi State Chapter of MFCR. This change is effective immediately!

I applaud his decision to break from those with whom he disagrees, but I would also not recommend him to automatically go join the Democratic Party.  If he’s a true Republican and believes in Republican principles, he’s not going to be welcomed with open arms by some in the Democratic Party.  Also, if he’s true to his principles, he’s not going to agree with much of what the Mississippi Democratic Party stands for or wants to achieve.  This is one of those cases where it’s better to be independent of both parties.  I found myself to be in that same situation where I didn’t like one group and didn’t agree with the other.  I generally try to vote for the person I think is best qualified, but because of the hyper partisan nature of our system, the primaries usually choose the worst possible candidates to vote for.  Then, it either boils down to a coin toss or an eenie-meenie-minie-mo type of vote for the lesser of two evils.

If I could talk with him, I’d suggest that he takes this election and strike out on his own.  Seek like-minded individuals who are sick of the BS and converse with them.  Our political system is headed for a major implosion within the next few election cycles.  The Tea Party is dragging the GOP so far to the right that it’s throwing the entire system out of balance.  If you’ve ever driven a car with a tire out of balance, you know how uncomfortable and unsettling that feels.  Eventually, the Tea Party is going to go so far to the Right that they’re going to wind up on the extreme far Left if they’re not careful.  The quest to be the most conservative candidate will eventually get rid of everyone else and that sole candidate will be quite lonesome by himself.

Mr. Alvarez, Kudos to you for finally seeing what many of us saw long ago.  In your current state, however, I’d suggest you refrain from taking the red pill to see how deep the rabbit hole goes.  That trip is one hell of a ride.

 

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4 thoughts on “The fallout from Mississippi’s GOP primary continues

  1. Mr. Alvarez is clearly in the same place I was in 2003, when I left the GOP (presumably for good).

    But I have to disagree with you on one point, Brosephus. Given some of the things Mr. Alvarez wrote in his resignation, he might very well be welcomed by moderate Democrats. Consider:

    “For example, the drastic cuts on needed federal funding that . . . Republican extremists support would leave society weak and crippled.”

    “This freedom should be available to each and every individual that wants to come work hard and pursue his or her goals in America.”

    “(T)he Republican Party has not done enough to put a stop to the hatred and cruel words and actions of the far right extremist in the party. The Republican Party consistently says they are trying to appeal to minorities, but this will never happen when we allow members of party to say cruel and ignorant things about Women, African Americans, Hispanics, and other minorities in our country.”

    So he’s pushing back against the GOP’s white power structure, against conservative marginalization of minorities and most critically to me, against conservative attempts to starve the government of the resources required to do its job and to protect the weaker members of our society. I don’t know about you, but he sounds like a pretty principled young man to me — one who might fit in very well on our side in Mississippi. He obviously can speak to conservative concerns (given his former position), but he’s also hitting the right notes to argue for progressive causes.

    He’s a young man worth watching, methinks.

    • I agree with you in that he’s worth watching, but I’ll give you my one major reason why I think he won’t be welcomed as much as we’d think by Democrats.

      He fits the mold for a Centrist Democrat based on his words. You’ve made the case. The liberal wing of the Democratic Party is going to soon tire of the rightward pull of the entire party because of centrists. That’s the one major flaw for being a party that welcomes all comers. This is the only advantage that I see the GOP having right now.

      As the GOP pulls further to the right, they shed moderates. The moderates then flow into the Democratic Party which has an overall effect of a lesser pull to the right, but a rightward shift indeed.

      The major failing of our current system is that we don’t have equal balance and the whole system is out of whack. Everything is going rightward. Clinton pulled the Dems to the right, and Obama has picked up with that theme and ran like Earl Dickerson running over a defensive line.

      I think that, for the betterment of the system overall, the Democratic Party needs a leftward shift. Nothing crazy, but something to counter the hard right direction. Then, once we get some semblance of balance, the moderates can get in where they fit in, or they can all simply group together and beat the cowboy sh*t out of both sides.

      • Excellent points, Brosephus, and I can’t argue with that, man. i do want to see things like single-payer health coverage (or even Medicare for all) become reality, and I think you’re right that moderate Democrats aren’t likely to ever get fully behind that sort of thing.

        You know that I do favor some business-friendly policies (ex: I’d like to see a Bracero/guest-worker program developed and properly run nationwide), but to my mind, the business-friendly policies I support don’t advance business interests above those of individuals and families.

        I guess the positive that I see in someone like Alvarez is that with enough of those kind of folks on our side, we eventually marginalize the crazies out of existence. Then, even if the former conservatives like Alvarez want to split off and form a more conservative party, hopefully we’ve built up enough trust and goodwill between lefties and righties that both liberal and conservative pols can tone down the rhetoric, look past labels and — ideally — get some decent governance done for a change. I don’t really see Alvarez as someone who could be *converted* to the Democratic side, but as someone who could be *worked with* by us. We can talk to him. We’ve got some common ground. He’s not going to reject us out of hand for being ‘pinko commies’ or some such. He’ll actually listen to us before disagreeing, and with a little negotiating and horse trading, we could even pass some decent legislation with him on the other side of the aisle.

        • I can completely agree with this. Like you, I have pro business ideas that I can support. What I can’t do is elevate the business agenda to the detriment of personal liberties and freedom.

          Time will tell whether or not we’ve done major damage to the system or just given ourselves a flesh wound.

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