Timing is everything… literally

Daylight Savings Time trips up millions of people twice a year with no mercy.  In the spring, there’s the lost hour that makes people late for work if they have to work early that Sunday.  In the fall, that extra hour usually claims its victims by having them show up at work or an appointment an hour earlier than required.  Not setting that watch back or up is the cause of cussing worldwide, but I don’t think anybody will be cussing like this guy.

Irish police believe that a “high-grade” bomb may have gone off prematurely on a Dublin street Sunday night because a man forgot to change his clocks for Daylight Savings Time, according to U.K. reports.

“It would appear that the bomber got his timings wrong,” a police source told the Mirror. “It could be a case where he didn’t put his watch forward on Sunday and the timer went off too soon.”

Although much of Canada lost an hour on March 9, the U.K. and Ireland switched to “summer time” early Sunday morning, at 1 a.m.

The explosion rocked Ireland’s capital at about 11 p.m. Sunday night.

The vehicle that was destroyed belonged to a local businessman who police say was the target for the bomb.  The explosion was powerful enough that police say that anybody in the car or walking nearby would have been killed.  The bomber survived the explosion somehow and was witnessed running from the scene.  I guess that, if he’s found, police can really determine if the time change bit him in the ass.

“His entire face was covered in what I thought was blood, but now know were severe burns,” said one eye-witness. “He was running down the street with his hands up to his face screaming ‘please help me, please help me’.”

The eye-witness said the injured man was around 5ft11 in height, no older than 30 and wearing a green/blue sporty-type jumper.

Some headlines say he killed himself, but obviously there are eyewitness accounts that say otherwise.  Either way, this guy should be easy to find, whether he’s dead or alive.    How hard would it be to find someone whose face was perfectly normal on Saturday and looked like a cheese pizza on Sunday?  If this doesn’t serve as a cautionary tale about setting your watch at Daylight Savings, I don’t know what will suffice.

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16 thoughts on “Timing is everything… literally

  1. Daylight Savings Time is like cutting a foot off one end of a blanket and sewing it on the other end. When you’re done, you’ve accomplished nothing. Leave it one way or the other and be done with it..

    Not many people know that this area used to be on Central Time, anyway. They changed it for the railroad schedules. The railroads are what brought about time zones to begin with, before that, everybody just lived by the sun.

    As for the guy in the article, am I the only one who sees the irony in a guy who just tried to blow somebody up, running down the street saying, “Please help me, please help me”?

    • No, you’re not the only one. I’d say that’s a little gift from the Karma Fairy.

      I’m also with you on the uselessness of Daylight Savings Time. I read a very interesting proposal that I think has a lot of merit: Do away with DST and cut the US to two time zones. Use what’s now Central time for Eastern and Central and use what’s now Mountain time for Mountain and Pacific. Essentially, those are the schedules most of us follow anyway. Those of us in the East tend to do things later by the clock but at the same hour people in the Central time zone do them. TV execs have long known this; TV schedules have reflected that reality almost from the first.

    • I like the foot analogy. As usual, you leave me with something that I didn’t know before in regards to the time zones. That makes sense though once you think about it.

      All my coworkers found humor with him asking for help after trying to off someone else. I remember some of the old people talking about not leaving well enough alone, and this guy fits the bill perfectly.

      • If you think about it, electricity brought us a 24/7 world, which isn’t a totally good thing in my view. Before that, you had no shift workers, etc. I remember many years ago asking Daddy how they read at night (he had no electricity or indoor plumbing, until he was drafted into Uncle Sam’s army and kerosene for lamps was expensive). I’ve never forgotten his reply, “Hell, when it got dark, we went to bed. We got up before daylight and worked ’til dark, so it wasn’t hard to get people to go to bed, back then”.

  2. One thing’s for sure. Seeing daylight didn’t save him from harm.

    About that fella downstairs. Hyenas usually go for the throat. Where were his balls during the feast?

    Weird!

  3. Have you heard of the Darwin Awards? This bloke could almost be a contender … (In case you haven’t: http://www.darwinawards.com/ I suspect your sense of humour will enjoy these!)
    I’ve just been thinking about how much I love the end of daylight savings, which just happens to be this weekend in Australia. An extra hour’s sleep, for free! That “slept in” feeling every morning this week! Waking up in the light, instead of the dark! Yes, I do love this week. And as I haven’t planned any bombs, suicide or other, I can rest easy in my enjoyment of it 🙂

    • Thanks for posting. I’ve heard of the Darwin Awards, and I think this guy would be a quality contender. He would be competing against hyena dude, and that is some stiff competition.

      Enjoy your time shift. We jumped up an hour a few weeks ago here in the US. I’m still missing that hour, but I was not late for work that morning.

      • Well done 🙂 Yes, work and the hour’s leap forward are not a happy mix! My husband grew up on a farm and every workday gets up before his alarm, which is set for 4:45am. (He doesn’t have to be at work until 8:20, because he’s a teacher, but he’s a creature of habit.) Thankfully he is on holidays this week, because making it to the end of the working day after rising at the new time of 3:30am is not fun. Speaking selfishly – I’m glad I don’t have to live with him through this!

        • My alarm clock is set to 3:30am all the time for work. My work day starts around 5AM, and I’m usually done for the day and in bed by 11pm. One of these days, I’m going to cut back on a few things so that I can get an extra hour of sleep. I just don’t know what to cut yet.

          • Yes, I read that you work as a mortgage broker; I would’ve thought those hours were better than when you were working as a comms advisor to a politician, but then, I don’t know anything about the world of finance.
            I used to work crazy hours. At one stage I added up all my commitments and I was working 2.5xEFT. That was a particularly bad, abusive employer … When I had my own business, I was regularly working 13 hour days, 6 days a week. Then I became unwell and haven’t been able to work for 9 months. Such is life.

          • Thirteen hour days are grueling. I’ve been there before myself, and that was not a good situation over the long term. I wish you a full and speedy recovery.

          • Thanks. It’s a long-term project. BTW I took a page out of your book and made my own list of long-term goals public. Thank you for the wonderful example.

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